Aquapreneur News

Issue 2

  • Can Fish be Turned Into Biofuel?

    Companies and local governments in Canada, Alaska, Hawaii, Honduras, and other places have been experimenting with fish-based biodiesel for years, and some commercial enterprises are using and selling it profitably. The amount of fish biodiesel being used is minuscule compared to availability, however. Using this waste oil for fuel has long been standard practice. According to the Alaska Energy Authority […]
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  • Toxin From Coral-reef Bacteria Could Become Next-generation Cancer DrugToxin From Coral-reef Bacteria Could Become Next-generation Cancer Drug

    University of Michigan (U-M) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers have acquired a new molecular tool that could help them transform a toxin from coral-reef bacteria into a next-generation cancer drug. U-M Life Sciences Institute researchers David Sherman and Janet Smith led a cross-disciplinary team that uncovered new functions for an ancient, well-known family of proteins […]
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  • Researchers View Swimming Tactics of Tiny Aquatic Predators Linked to Fish Kills

    By applying state-of-the-art holographic microscopy to a major marine biology challenge, researchers from two Baltimore institutions have identified the swimming and attack patterns of two tiny but deadly microbes linked to fish kills in the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways. The study focused on the aquatic hunting tactics of two single-celled creatures classified as dinoflagellates. These two-tailed microbes feed on […]
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  • Natural Marine Product Currently Being Tested to Treat Cancer

    A research team led by Bradley Moore at the marine biomedical laboratories at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego discovered an enzyme inside a bacterium identified in 1991 called Salinispora tropica. The enzyme, called SalL, is currently being tested to treat cancer in humans. The Salinispora derivative “Salinosporamide A” is currently in phase I of human clinical trials […]
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  • GlycoMar secures £260,000 investment

    Scottish marine biotechnology company GlycoMar Ltd has recently secured further investment of £260,000 from its investors, as the first stage of a targeted £2.5 M funding round. This will allow the Company to expand and accelerate its drug discovery operations, taking potential marine anti-inflammatory drugs into clinical development. GlycoMar, which means ‘sweet sea’, is dedicated to the discovery, development and […]
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  • Improving the Growth Rate of Farmed Cod with New Lighting Technology

    Cod held in intensive culture typically mature within 2 years from hatching, with reduced somatic growth rates, deterioration of flesh composition and reduction of wet weight by at least 25%. A delay or cessation of maturation during on-growing is therefore crucial for profitable farming. The advent of a new lighting technology based on Cold Cathode Light Tubes enables fish farmers […]
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  • Brown Marine Algae Mined for Functional Ingredients

    Franck Hennequart and his colleagues at the National University of Ireland in Galway have developed a process to extract alginates, laminaran and fucoidans from brown algae. Alginates are currently used as low-cost thickening and viscosity stabilizers for such products as salad dressings, and for microencapsulated ingredients. Laminarans are used in horticulture, but otherwise have no other industrial applications, and fucoidans […]
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  • Algae Provides Potential Alternative Fuel Source

    The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in South Africa aims to develop a process for the production of biodiesel from algae, states CSIR bioprocessing development research team leader Raj Lalloo. The desktop study for this project was started in 2006, and laboratory research was undertaken earlier this year. “Algae have long been known to produce lipids that can […]
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  • Bacterial Adhesion to Stainless Steel is Reduced by Aqueous Fish Extract Coatings

    A study conducted by the Danish Institute for Fisheries Research concludes that coating a stainless steel surface with a non-toxic fish extract is more effective in preventing microbial adhesion and biofilm formation than uncoated surfaces or surfaces coated with tryptone soy broth. Microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on surfaces pose major problems and risks to human health. In the study, […]
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  • Deep Sea Treatment for Superbug Holds Promise, Yet Still Poses Challenges.

    A group of United Kingdom scientists recently discovered a bacterium found in Japanese seabeds with the ability to kill MRSA. The new species produces a unique antibiotic that has the potential for treating humans. William Fenical, a pioneer of marine microbiology at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, supports that scientists need to look elsewhere to discover new antibiotics with new […]
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